Toasted Earth

Kiwi Eco Box: Kate & Nataly Trusova

August 18, 2021 Season 1 Episode 12
Toasted Earth
Kiwi Eco Box: Kate & Nataly Trusova
Show Notes Transcript

This episode features Kate and Nataly Trusova, the founders of Kiwi Eco Box. Kiwi Eco Box is a monthly eco-friendly subscription box that helps you integrate zero-waste concepts into your lifestyle easily and build a plastic-free routine. Every month Kiwi Eco Box subscribers get from 5 to 7 different products, that are shipped in 100% plastic-free packaging with paper wrapping, labels, and tape — all of which are recyclable and compostable.

Kate and Nataly realized that when going zero-waste, knowing what to buy, where to buy it, and if the products are good enough is both challenging and confusing. They thought it would be great if there was a service that delivered everything they needed on a regular basis, so they decided to start Kiwi Eco Box.

Michelle, Kate and Nataly discuss how their grandma's lifestyle in a village in Ukraine introduced them to low-waste living, how COVID-19 resulted in them having the time to pursue the Kiwi Eco Box idea and how living zero-waste doesn't have to be hard or expensive.

Relevant links:
https://kiwiecobox.com/
https://kiwiecoshop.com/

Support the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/toastedearth)

Michelle Cunningham:

Hello and welcome to the Toasted Earth podcast a show about founders, visionaries and environmentalist pursuing novel ideas and sustainability to, ultimately, save the earth. I'm your host, Michelle Cunningham and for today's episode we have Kate and Nataly Trusova, the founders of Kiwi Eco Box. Kiwi Eco Box is a monthly eco-friendly subscription box that helps you integrate zero-waste concepts into your lifestyle easily and build a plastic-free routine. Every month Kiwi Eco Box subscribers get from five to seven different products that are shipped in 100% plastic-free packaging with paper wrapping labels and tape, all of which are recyclable and compostable. Kate and Nataly realized that when going zero-waste, knowing what to buy, where to buy it and if the products were good enough is both challenging and confusing. They thought it would be great if there was a service that delivered everything they needed on a regular basis, so they started Kiwi eco box.

Kate Trusova:

I am Ukrainian who moved to Austin, Texas four years ago and during the pandemic, I lost my job and I had nothing to do basically and while ago I had in my mind I was living environmentally friendly for I don't know, forever, I would say yeah, I was so cautious about environment issues, because of my parents because of my grandma. And during the pandemic, I just had a little bit more free time. And me and Nataly, we decided to create something special that would help people to start their journey towards zero-waste lifestyle. That's how Kiwi Eco Box was born.

Michelle Cunningham:

You mentioned your parents and your grandparents. What about them led you towards a more environmentally friendly life.

Kate Trusova:

So my grandma, she passed away a few years ago, but she used to leave in the village in Ukrainian, very modest village where people are doing their best trying to conserve every thing they have. And that's why she always I mean, she put a just in my mind that I have to always conserve the water, I have to turn the lights off, you know, because it's money too. And she basically didn't want to pay much or more than she could, right. And that's what the first thing But the second thing is that she had also a lot of chickens and other like animals, farm animals, cows and others. And she always used for example, we never had, we never used any dishwashing powder or Chow whenever we wash our dishes, because she preferred to conserve that water and use it after for making mail for chickens. And for cows. You know, that's how we never used any chemicals in our dishwashing routine. Because everything was reused again and again and again. And I remember once he asked me, we had a plastic bag, and it has a hole. And we also had like a sewing machine. So she asked me to sue like to tie the whole the plastic bag, you know that she could reuse that back again. And that's how was the environment where we grew up. And our like basic principles in life we tried to carry through.

Michelle Cunningham:

Well, it sounds like it came a little bit out of necessity. But then you and Nataly both took that with you even maybe, maybe it's not as much of a necessity now, I might be assuming too much. But you can tell me,

Nataly Trusova:

I can tell you. I live in Ukraine in Kiev. And yesterday, I went to supermarket it's a small supermarket, but it's a chain that goes all around Ukraine and what specific about them is they also have a spot in small towns almost like religious and life in Ukraine, of course, I think not only in Ukraine everywhere. The first like big cities and small towns. And I heard this advertisement saying that like that's a family and husband is saying oh let's go like for some vacation and his wife replies at no we cannot. It's canning season like people need now to can all like vegetables, fruits for winter season. And I was like, Yes, you know, like it is and this is how we used to live even we were like Believe it or not. In the village, but in the summer, we would, you know, like have, I don't know, 100 kilos of tomatoes prepared of cucumber have ever seen, instead of buying something, you know like that with chemicals, we will do everything at home. Same for our Grandma, and people still doing so leaving in Ukraine, you know, it's not actually as hard especially if you even like in the small town village to leaves your waist because you basically it's not that developed, you don't have all this stupid plastic packaging that you cannot get rid of. And you know, like some people they don't even know that is a problem. You know, like, I mean, why people are going crazy about that, because also talking about our Grandma, you know, they, they would never like throw any like a garbage, you know, like we didn't have like garbage bin because basically what can go to compost, it will go to like chickens or like really to compost. What can be kind of like reuse, reuse, and what cannot be reused, they will fire it and burn it, burn it. And, of course, it's not good. But now I live in Kiev and I, for example, have recycling the factory not far from me is that everyone can go bring what they want. If it's recyclables, it's, they will take it for free. If it's not, they take it. And then also, I think they also burn it, but you need to pay extra for it. So for example, I for me, it looks like in Ukraine, now, like even in Kiev, not in small town, leaving zero waste much more easy. Because it's like, you know, it's all accessible. You don't need to put a lot of effort into it. You just need to do all the small actions. So I mean, I guess this progress and globalization is, you know, like, walking us away from actually environment or taking care of both our planets. They an eco friendly.

Michelle Cunningham:

Yeah, yeah. And Kate, because you've moved to the US. So you're in Austin now?

Kate Trusova:

Yeah.

Michelle Cunningham:

It sounds a lot different from how things are going and Kiev in terms of like, how much waste happens. Did anything change for you when you came out here?

Kate Trusova:

Well, Michelle, I can see the look in your eyes and how you're surprised at our grandma story. Yeah, but of course, first when I came to us, I worked in YMCA summer camp, like 10 years ago, in New Jersey, and I worked I helped the kitchen to cook food to prepare food for kids. And I was shocked. What amount of food was thrown away every day. I like I couldn't believe it. Like my heart was crying. I was like, please, you know, let's save the food. We cannot do it. And yeah, that was like a first shock. And I still remember that. But then I moved four years ago. And I wouldn't say that. I was surprised because I knew the situation. But what surprised me how people, they just do not care. I'm talking about my generation. and older. I think younger people they have like more kids especially they have environmental lessons right now in school and they become more aware of what's going on in the world. But my generation and older people just they just don't care. It holds just loggers of how ever since convenient. If I can say you know, they just and they enjoy the convenience you know that he can get everything on the go. And of course wasn't a lot of rap plastic. And but yeah, just a culture I think.

Michelle Cunningham:

But you were able to adapt your low waste lifestyle to being here.

Kate Trusova:

I would say I would say it's hard to not have a trash bin how my my grandma she didn't, but she did not have. She didn't have trash bin just because you have to pay for trash. And she didn't want to pay for trash. So that's why she just managed her life that way that she wouldn't have any trash that she would need to pay for that. And here of course it's harder. I would say that you have to adjust it you have build your team build your time. Yeah, but of course I would say that it's not possible for 100% but at least of course like I can post at home. I always have bags in my car or produce bags. You know if I need to go to the store I have to like them everywhere. to not forget that carry with me cutlery said count There's water bottle like everything what I can I do, of course.

Michelle Cunningham:

And Nataly, it sounds like the paying for trash is still a thing in Kiev, right? So you said you go there and if you have trash, you have to like pay in that moment to get rid of it?

Nataly Trusova:

No, you go to this recycling station. And let's say you bring everything you want to you can you can bring everything like, I'm sure they even have now compost bin, the only thing it's like, it's not very close to me. So you need to drive there.

Kate Trusova:

But once you say everything, she meant different type of plastic, because not every type of plastic is recycled.

Michelle Cunningham:

Yeah. Okay.

Nataly Trusova:

Yeah, I mean, let's say take about 25 different kinds of materials that they will take, it's recyclable, so they will take it for free. And then ever since that is not recyclable, let's say, like all plastics that is not recyclable. And also, there is some other stuff like, let's say, different bottles that you know, like from different types of plastic all in bands that you cannot recycle. It's too expensive. So no one does it. So then all this trash is separate. And this trash that is not recyclable, you can just throw it away in the regular bin. But if you want to just I don't know, what's the word like destroy it, then you need to pay money for it, but it will not go to landfill. I see. I see. They're burning it out. And then yeah, that's what they do. Yeah, but they burnt out. But it's not just burning out outside.

Michelle Cunningham:

Okay, interesting. I kind of love this history about your grandma, and how you guys grew up, because it just gets so much more back to basics of we should be reusing things and not just making things to be disposable. But yeah, okay, so you, you live this way, growing up, you can end up having some extra time because of COVID and losing your job. And you guys decide to start Kiwi Eco Box. How did you go from like, the idea to actually starting the business.

Kate Trusova:

So that idea I had a while ago in my mind, because I saw everything around me and it scared me and I thought, okay, we have to like do something to put something in people's mind to educate them how to do right. But I was also always busy, you know, and then free time, okay, I moved to actually right before the call. It's like one day before the world current team. I moved to Ukraine, I not moved, I traveled to Ukraine, and the next day currently in happens, like everywhere. And so basically, we were locked in our apartment, we couldn't go anywhere. And if you remember, like a year ago, it was now we are now about COVID something but back then we didn't know anything about that. And the scares sit inside our apartment and afraid to even, you know, step outside of our house home. And yeah, I shared my idea with Nataly. And I knew. I mean, I know her background, like what is her strongest points, right? how she's really good in business development and brand awareness. And I just share with her the idea and to liked it. She did her own research. And she said that, yeah, it's a good idea. And if she said, there's a good idea, and it's a good idea. So yeah, that's how we started. I moved back to not move twice. I moved. I traveled back to Ukraine. After three weeks. And to Austin, I travel back and to Yeah, we slowly started. Everything happened so fast. Yeah, we were talking in April, about like this project and may 15. We started presale, or I think my first we started with pre sale.

Michelle Cunningham:

Oh, yeah, that's really fast. That's great. Nataly, what is your background?

Nataly Trusova:

Yeah, so I used to work in the business development for some advertisement network. They were doing different type of ads. Also, I had some experience in e commerce, a little bit marketing. So it was all something interesting for me. And then Kate had this idea in her mind. And we were thinking how to better kind of like shape it. So it's good to make a subscription or better to go with no subscription model. And then we just started to see what kind of like how to actually make it happen. What like technical solution or the market because we had like no really super background. In business on or like, you know, creating business starts in business. But sounds step by step, we make it happen. And first month is we're really interesting. Also, I think I'm happy is that lockdown happened actually, because I had some time off from my job because didn't have nothing to do there. So I could invest that time in building actually, slowly our brand, and it's growing. Unfortunately, then later, we were also in a good time, because, you know, like, it was April, May, people are struggling this COVID they didn't know like how long we'll be locked down, they were spending a lot of time home, crawling the you know, like Instagram or Facebook. So that's why we kind of like could pick up fast and start to grow, then the world came back to reality in summer. People right, understood, okay, you know, like, it's for one time. So of the kind of like, little bit slow down, but I hope now, we will restart again. Because, first of all, I think it's a big trend now. And not because it's only a trend, but people start to think about something more than just covering their basic needs. Also, I mean, otherwise not good. But brands start to kind of like build. Also some the names or you know, like kind of like popularity state all this eco conscious thing sustainability. People already care, like where you produce stuff, how you shape, if it's environmentally friendly, it's compostable, and so on. So goods at slowly, slowly, slowly, a lot of like, more and more people start to pay attention. And yeah, you know, like, when especially you read all reviews, and people are happy that they're changing, because mostly our customers, our subscribers, they are people that are new to this product, so they're always leaving. So in a way, our idea and how actually it works, we help them slowly builds this zero waste routine starts in, you know, like, adopt some products in their life. And also, we kind of like, you know, like, bring in Samsung's that they never used, they don't know, like, you know how even to use some products. So it's also educating our subscribers in a way.

Michelle Cunningham:

Yeah, that was one of the things that I loved about your website that it brought up how it's, it can actually be quite challenging to go Zero Waste at first and like figure out okay, what are all the products that I should be getting? Like, where do I find them? What are the good ones? What are how do I avoid ones that are just like greenwashing? Yeah. So walk me through Kate, how this works for a new customer. If I wanted to go to Kiwi eco box and sign up, like what would happen?

Kate Trusova:

How does a subscription works you normally sign up and you receive a box every month was five to seven different products which are plastic free compostable, and of course, they have no harm to the environment after you know the end of their life cycle. And some of the products repeat. For example, we send every other month the loofah sponge for dishwashing people could replace the ones that they already had. And for the new one without all the hassle. For example, bamboo toothbrush, we send every three months for people to replace their old one. And there are like specific type of products like bamboo toothbrush, loofahs paunch sponge, dish brush, bamboo cue tapes, and others that we are sent from time to time people to restock their items. And other than that, there are some new products all the time, like makeup rounds, bamboo brushes, laundry detergent, they're like out of plastic at all. And we give people opportunity to know that such a product is exist. And you can replace your laundry detergent that you used to buy like from tide or whoever the other brands right. Other things that I have here, it's also cork coasters. They're made out of cork. So yeah, so it's also educational. Our box I would say has educational background to the main issues. Not only like to put Are you on track and make you buy all that stuff? Not really. But to know that other things are exist. Like here I have also, zero waste sunscreen comes in a metal jar and THC I use it myself, and yet we have it in our store as well. Yeah, so people buy, people start to receive their box on monthly basis. And yeah, that's all free and you receive start to know about different goods and you can restock your items if you already have

Michelle Cunningham:

when people come to when they find you like what are they looking for? Are they looking for help in starting zero waste? Are they not even aware that like, all these products are out there, and they come across? And they're like, Oh, this is a thing? I didn't know. Like, what what are people saying about it,

Kate Trusova:

We noticed a lot of people who didn't even know about some of the items that they are exist. And I will say that the majority of our subscribers, it's people, it's people who want to live zero-waste, who know about the environment, who know about environmental issues, but they don't know where to start. And what to do for newbies, let's say in the zero waste lifestyle.

Michelle Cunningham:

How would you say that starting with Kiwi Eco Box compared to someone trying to start going zero-waste on their own from like, resources and energy use standpoint because there's some resources and energy used involved in in like preparing your box, right? There's products going into it, it's being shipped. How would that compare to what someone would have to do if they were doing it all on their own?

Kate Trusova:

Yeah, it would tell it takes a lot of efforts first to search for products. Because how I came up with the issue was not was the issue. But was the idea. When I wanted to purchase when I moved to your ascent, I wanted to purchase something plastic free, it was a challenge for me. Like I started to I spend hours researching the dish brush, plastic free that wouldn't cost like millions, you know, and will be sustainable. And whenever I found something good and nice and affordable, it was out of stock. So I was thinking that time that wow, if it's so complicated, like just to get their waste products from me how people around us could switch to zero waste lifestyle. If it's so complicated, like it takes so much effort to research to find because relatively You know, there are not that many Zero Waste stores in us, I would say just like, I don't know, some tiny stores somewhere and you have to learn look like all if there exists. Yeah, you can tell us your experience. If you have any zero-waste stores.

Michelle Cunningham:

Not like a brick and mortar store. I think there's a refillery in Berkeley, which is about a 20-30 minute drive from me. And they do like where you can bring in a jar and get like shampoo put in the jar and then avoid all the packaging there. I know of zero-waste online stores, but I'm also looking for that stuff all the time. It's kind of what I do for the podcast is go out and look for like, what are the businesses out there that are doing this stuff. But yeah, it's it's not. It's not obvious from my perspective that there's easy ways to find all this stuff for just your average person. You definitely do have to go, go digging, is it is it different in Ukraine? Are there other options there?

Nataly Trusova:

Oh, I wouldn't say there are many options, some small brands starting to appear. And but let's say if you go to I recently, if someone will go on our Instagram, I did Instagram rails when I went to a supermarket and so what kinda like products are already tagged in plastic instead of not being packed in plastic. And soon I will post another video about products that actually found that are kind of like help you to get rid of plastic balls is reusable bags match bags, and I find that many products maybe I found like five I started to fail. And then I was like, okay, like, what's next? I couldn't find anything. So I will say that many but people starting to kind of like choose or start looking for for some products. So slowly, slowly. We are getting there. But not many options. Not many choices. Yeah.

Michelle Cunningham:

Yeah, I do think over time it'll be more and more because it does seem like it's it's a slow process but people are becoming more are aware of all the waste that's going on.

Nataly Trusova:

I don't know if maybe I'm wrong but people have the stigma that it's actually expensive to use your ways because even like to buy some, you know, like reusable stuff, you know, it's expensive, let's say one time buy, you know, in Ukraine now it's a lot of reasons not to say you cannot buy, I don't know, some reusable, it might be coffee cup for $10 but you can find some in coffee shop some super fancy for I don't know, like $60 and people see that and they like pay $62 are like some cop. No, I'm not buying that. And that's why he knows I think okay, it's super expensive. I don't need that. In Ukraine, you know, financial situation is not that good. That's why but it's also more like people not here yet a dead state that the simple term for them, it's okay, like, but like everywhere, every time get new plastic bag in the supermarket. I have a friend who lives in Luxembourg. And she's saying you know, like yeah, I guess in us and stuff. In some states you also have it now that you cannot even buy plastic bag if you want only like reusable bags, and everything is recycling all products now she's architect. So all products now need to have some element of it. Now some things need to be created from products that are recycle, or at least user like destroying some building zanza collect all this materials later to they can use them in some other projects. So if you have any idea in this like area, you easily can get some investments and funds. It's very like now pushed by government by society. And all people like our own it like they have this as, say creating common gardens, public like gardens where people can start grow some like vegetables or green. And they come in they're actually not because we want to take something from there, just because they want to touch Xena like soil to Samsung, who's there and actually, like socialize?

Michelle Cunningham:

Well, it's cool to see that stuff happening around different places in the world. We have some of it here, like at our grocery stores, you can't get plastic bags where I am, you can get paper bags, but you have to pay for them. Or you can bring like your own reusable bag. But it all just depends. city by city state by state in the US but Well it sounds like because you mentioned how people think eco friendly products are expensive. Are you guys finding that they don't have to be?

Kate Trusova:

I would say that whenever someone is saying that being zero waste is expensive. I'm always bringing up the story about my grandma, that the reason she went Zero Waste because she didn't want to pay for trash. And I would say it's not expensive at all. On contrary, it can save you some money. Because you don't need to buy stuff that you don't need. You just can reuse your stuff. What do you have reuse constantly? And that the key

Michelle Cunningham:

Thinking about the future of Kiwi Eco Box, where do you hope the company goes from here?

Kate Trusova:

Where the stage right now that we are rebuilding our internal operations and rebuilding our web page to become more beautiful. Yeah, because you know, we originally when we created our website, it was created by us. Like we didn't hire in even anyone, we just learned very fast how to build a website and created a website. And it's still our website that you see right now. So don't judge us. But now we're working on improving our visual part of our brand. And we are rebuilding our website, we are changing the packaging for our boxes, to be more. I don't know, it's still very simple, but in some way it has like just a little bit of touch. You know, just to add something special to it. The main goal for us is to educate people around the world. And to bring awareness like we also sometimes we do school lessons for kids environmental school lessons for kids all over the world. Just to I don't know the Dahlia I would say have more vision on our plants than me I'm just like concerned in internal operations and and that mentality is a business developer.

Michelle Cunningham:

Do you want to jump in there?

Nataly Trusova:

Yeah, so I wanted to say that you know, keeping bird can't fly. And and I hope we will fly soon. to our customers. But yeah, they're changed. We have some ideas to now to work with a bit, improve it. First of all, visual guides, not on the like for looking more nicely. But also, I think because today I did some some branding to be more like naughty. So you know that people will more likely to, let's say, shows their friend Samson or let's say feature it on like their social pages like Instagram, do some unpacking, because then it's helped to grow community. Also, we are thinking about and with a new website to change a little bit model, because we had some people criticizing us that let's say subscription box, and all items, they have a inside, they are not chosen. And for us, yes, we understand that of course, for ideally will be your for everyone could choose all the box and really like builds their routine, but then it will be kind of like our ideas more to educate them not actually to send them some basic product because fellow basic products would come to, I don't know, like cotton swabs or bamboo toothbrush. And I don't know like the toothpaste and so on like very, very basic. But we add to every book some interesting items from like small brands. So maybe you will try it, you will never use it. But maybe you will try it actually. And you'll start ordering more France's brand support like other brands, which is I think great way, because mostly, it's really like small local brands, some of them based in Austin, we have now this idea that let's say 70% of items, let's say for items we pick and then to Sam, you can choose from, let's say some options. So then in the way you can customize it and because people I think they want it with it some like customer research, we asked our subscribers, how do they like the Cynthia and mostly it's a they actually were a Walton for it. So let's see, but it will come in in your website, which I hope we will have in August writing. And already next skeevy. ico box will be will be already silent from a new website. So yet check check our website in one month.

Michelle Cunningham:

What do you think are the challenges that you guys are going to face over the next year or so?

Nataly Trusova:

Well, I think it's a challenge to grow because we are a small company. And we compete against really big companies. Now everyone is trying to because also greenwashing try to get into this market. And yeah, it's hard when you're small business. Also, other challenges. We don't know about other challenges yet, you know, like they sometimes are coming unexpectedly. So let's see.

Michelle Cunningham:

Anything you want to add there, Kate, any challenges you're anticipating?

Kate Trusova:

Yeah, four biggest challenge for me is to stay focused and find time and never give up. Even if something doesn't go right. Just keep going. Or if, for example, something's not working, redo, retransform and put all our efforts in some other directions, but definitely not stopping.

Michelle Cunningham:

I love that outlook because I think to be a founder of a business you have to have that outlook. No matter what the ups and downs are. You just keep trying just keep iterating until it works. Is there anything our listeners can do to help you guys?

Kate Trusova:

Of course stop buying plastic bags, carrying them always carrying the reusable bags, always in the car in the purse like whenever you go just keep it with you. And don't use single use plastic just unnecessary switch the bamboo toothbrush, bring your own lunch containers and bring your reusable cup now it's I don't know how it's in California. But right now you can finally bring your usable top to Starbucks. Yeah. Because before they banded before because of the COVID and yeah, just think about that your body is higher material. And you have to take care about it how you take care about the earth because it's same material we all are from, you know water. I just did the Instagram stories for our accounts that like 65% of our body is water. So why do we need like the water should be clean? Start from yourself and do your best what you can do to prevent the water from pollution, plastic pollution, especially

Michelle Cunningham:

Anything you want to add there, Nataly?

Nataly Trusova:

Yeah, so if someone wants to help, the best way, of course will be to subscribe and start receiving our boxes. Or you can subscribe to our accounts on social medium, we do, we almost don't promote, actually our product there. But we post a lot of educational, motivational content, which you can share with friends, family, start educating them as well and sharing the word. I think the problem why we are not getting there where we all want, it's lack of education, lack of knowledge, especially in Ukraine, people don't even know that there is how many plastic there is already floating in the ocean, they just don't realize, like the size of their problem. And that's why they don't care. And once you start showing them, as it's exist, and it's a big problem, and this time, it's only increasing, then they start to realize, Oh, really, maybe I need to do something.

Michelle Cunningham:

Yeah, when the problem is separated from you, it's really easy to not think it's that big of a problem. But I'm learning more and more from all of the entrepreneurs out there that if you go to other places in the world, if you look at a wider net of what's going on, there's just so many things that we we need to fix or do a little bit better. So yeah. Well, before we sign off, we like to end every episode with a toast to the earth. Kate, do you want to start? What do you hope for our planet's future?

Kate Trusova:

I really hope that, I not only hope I see how we are doing like we are on our way there because of the kids education program. But I really hope people will find or scientists will find some treatment for our planet, some treatment that would help to combine all this plastic that we have and just somehow destroy it. I don't know how that would be fantastic. And I want people to be more aware of what's going on. And as I told earlier, to care about their planet, same way, how they care about yourself.

Michelle Cunningham:

And Nataly, what do you hope for our planet's future?

Nataly Trusova:

I hope people will wake up, they start to think and before going and building life on other planets, they will start actually doing something here.

Michelle Cunningham:

Thanks for listening to the show today. If you love this show, please leave us a review wherever you listen to podcasts. You can learn more about Kiwi Eco Box by visiting kiwiecobox. com that's k-i-w-i-e-c-o-b-o-x dot com or visit our show notes at toastedearth.com for more links and details about this episode. If you're currently working on an idea, company, nonprofit or movement to benefit the environment, send us an email at hello@toastedearth.com we would love to hear from you. Raise a glass to the earth everyone, it's the only one we've got.